Free Workshop at Vanderbilt next week (3/31)

Screen Shot 2015-03-24 at 8.10.51 AM
 
Presented by Seed Space and the Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville.

Join Seed Space with founding editor
of Art F City Paddy Johnson March 31.

NFA Student Workshop
5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Curb Center at Vanderbilt
1801 Edgehill Ave

This NFA student workshop is free to students attending Austin Peay State University, Lipscomb University, and Vanderbilt University.

Art F City creates and archives critical discourse, and commissions ambitious artist projects. Through a daily mix of blunt criticism, commentary and community-minded journalism, they add an unparalleled dosage of purposeful opinion to the contemporary art community.

“An ambitious option [to mainstream print criticism] that combines criticism, reporting, political activism and gossip on an almost­24­hour news cycle. That mix would probably be even more varied, and transcultural, if a few forward­thinking, art­minded investors would infuse some serious capital into such enterprises so they could pay writers a living wage.”
Holland Cotter, art critic, New York Times

Paddy Johnson is the founding Editor of Art F City and the Arts Editor for The L Magazine. In addition to her work on the blog, she has been published in magazines such as New York Magazine, The Economist, and The Guardian, and linked to by publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Awl.

Paddy lectures widely about art and the Internet at venues including Yale University, Parsons, Rutgers, South by Southwest, and the Whitney Independent Study Program.In 2007 she received a scholarship to attend iCommons conference in Croatia as the art critic. In 2008, she served on the board of the Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowships and became the first blogger to earn a Creative Capital Arts Writers grant from the Creative Capital Foundation. Paddy was nominated for best art critic at The Rob Pruitt Art Awards in 2010 and has won Village Voice award for Best Art Blog for the last two years running. Paddy also writes a regular column on art for The L Magazine.

Ane Graff

http://anegraff.com/
YG2
 
From: http://www.frieze.com/shows/review/ane-graff/:
“Flowing from the surface into the soil, groundwater cuts through rock. Even something as solid as marble becomes porous and fragile when subjected to this slow erosion. Penetrating the smallest cracks and amassing in vast subterranean reservoirs, groundwater eventually emerges again in sudden gushes or slow trickles. In ‘Your Groundwater’ (all works 2012–13), Norwegian artist Ane Graff presents new works that use this process as a metaphor, not only for the seepage of time and its deconstructive force, but also for a kind of surfacing, in all the ambivalence of the term.”
 

Sculpture 2/3 – Chris Burden response writing DEADLINE EXTENDED

The folder will remain open until THIS FRIDAY 2/27 at 10am. Please try to get your responses uploaded to D2L by that time. Each of these reading/response assignments counts for 10pts on your final grade point average for this course. For example, missing 5 of them would be equal to receiving an F on a project grade.
 

Sculpture 1: HW: revised production schedule due Thurs 2/26, castings due March 6th, installation plan also due March 6th

Revised production schedules for 100 Objects (Project 1) will be due THIS THURSDAY 2/26 by 9am. Please upload them to the D2L Dropbox labeled “Production Schedule (revised).”
 
The new due date for your 100 casted objects will be Friday March 6th (the day before Spring Break). You will be required to upload images of your 100 objects to the D2L Dropbox folder labeled “100 objects: IMAGES” by 6pm on that date.
 
A one paragraph description of your display/presentation plan is also due on March 6th. You can upload it to the D2L folder labeled “100 object: Installation Plan.”
 
Critique of the 100 Objects Project will happen when we return from Spring Break.

Sculpture 2/3: HW: Readings and Responses to Project 2: Beauty

Four readings on the concept of beauty and a suggested schedule for completion:
 
Week 1 (2/23): Read and respond: Dubuffet’s AntiCultural Positions, 1951(anticultural_positions) response due Monday 3/2@9pm
 
Week 2 (3/2): Read and respond: Elaine Scarry’s On Beauty and Being Just, 1998 (scarry_onbeauty.pdf), response due Monday 3/9@9pm
 
Week 3 (3/9): (Spring Break)
 
Week 4 (3/16): Read and respond: Dave Hickey’s On the Vernacular of Beauty, 1993 (hickey_beauty_selected_essays),1993, response due by Monday 3/23@ 9pm
 
Week 5 (3/23): Read and respond: Wolfgang Welsh’s The Return of Beauty?, 2007 (return_of_beauty), response due on Monday 3/30@ 9pm
 

Free Downloads/Software for beginner-level 3D printing

Sculpture 2/3: If possible, please download the Makerbot and Autodesk software to your personal laptops/devices by our class meeting on 2/26.
 
Makerbot Desktop Bundle: easy interface for printing objects/designs
http://www.makerbot.com/desktop
 
Autodesk 123D Design: program for designing/modifying objects
http://www.123dapp.com/design
 
Thingiverse: a resource for downloading/uploading designs
http://www.thingiverse.com/
 
And this is an extra download that could be helpful…
 
Autodesk 123D Make: specializes in translating digital to physical..
http://www.123dapp.com/make
 

Sculpture 2/3 – Schedule for the remainder of the semester

NOTE: THIS SCHEDULE IS TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Week One (2/23-27): Continue Performative Object Project, set up schedule and monitor hours for next week, Introduce Project 2: Beauty, HW: Makerbot research, Start readings on Project 2: Beauty – Elaine Scarry and Jean Dubuffet (Responses to both readings are due on Monday 3/9 @11pm)

Week Two (3/2-6): Finish Performative Object Project, Prepare/Install for Critique HW: upload Makerbot tutorial links to D2L Dropbox, Project 2 readings and responses (due 3/9) (Virginia at Anderson Ranch all week)

Week Three (3/9-13): Spring Break, Be ready for a class discussion on Elaine Scarry and Dubuffet readings on Tuesday 3/17.

Week Four (3/16-20): Critique: Performative Object Project, Makerbot Workshop, HW: Design for 3D printing

Week Five (3/23-27): Print w/Makerbot, Begin Project 2, (Virginia at conference 3/26-28)

Week Six (3/30-4/3): Project 2 (work week)

Week Seven (4/6-10): Project 2 (work week) HW:presentation and display

Week Eight (4/13-16): Install and Critique Project 2, Introduce Project 3: Invisible/Visible

Week Nine: (4/20-24): Project 3 (work week)

Week Ten: (4/27-30): Project 3 (work week) HW:presentation and display

Week Eleven: EXAM WEEK: Install and Critique Project 3

Sculpture 1 – Schedule for the remainder of the semester

NOTE: THIS SCHEDULE IS TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Week One (2/23-27): Continue 100 objects, revise production schedules, HW: Installation, presentation, and display

Week Two (3/2-6): Install and prepare for crit, (Virginia at Anderson Ranch)

Week Three (3/9-13): Spring Break

Week Four (3/16-20): Critique: 100 objects, Introduce Project 2

Week Five (3/23-27): Begin Project 2, (Virginia at conference 3/26-28)

Week Six (3/30-4/3): Project 2 (work week)

Week Seven (4/6-10): Project 2 (work week) HW:presentation and display, Makerbot research (find tutorials and upload links to independent research on D2L dropbox)

Week Eight (4/13-16): Install and Critique Project 2, Introduce Project 3, Makerbot demo

Week Nine: (4/20-24): Makerbot workshop, Project 3 (work week)

Week Ten: (4/27-30): Project 3 (work week) HW:presentation and display

Week Eleven: EXAM WEEK: Install and Critique Project 3

Regarding Beauty @ the Hirshhorn Museum, 1999

00010782
A link to a review of the exhibition in the Baltimore Sun:
http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1999-10-17/entertainment/9910160367_1_ideal-of-beauty-wrote-that-beauty-20th-century/2

“The goal of the present exhibition is clear: to continue a passionate dialog about the changing nature and perception of beauty over the last four decades of the twentieth century. Those years have been marked by an apparent shift from formalism characterized by Frank Stella’s “what-you-see-is-what-you-see” approach toward an art with a near total reliance on content. If, as some might contend, formalism and content are at opposite extremes, it can be said that the pendulum has begun to swing once again…”

James T. Demetrion
Director, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
on the exhibition Regarding Beauty (1999-2000)